English

Jacobinian Islamism: when the subject becomes annoying

In critical thinking the blackmail of the expected response always hangs like the sword of Damocles over our heads. As if to realise that walking on the wrong path should automatically mean one always has another path to propose. It is not so! Some paths should never have been followed whilst somewhere else perspectives have to be formed based in paths that do not carry the burden of previous choices. Obviously democracy and its reinforcement in its structures and content is another uncharted path that we should ourselves open, eliminating certainties (such as "sheltering" freedom from enemies) that, hitherto, have led to dead ends. We must appeal to broadening democracy itself without fearing whether it is not liberal enough for our standards (to invest in its growth rather in its 'protection'). But the latter is primarily an issue of political action to undertake, and secondarily of political thought to be discussed.

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In Greece, as the state collapses, the neighborhoods organize – An interview with a member of the Athenian assembly movement

An interview conducted for issue no. 7 [2013] of the French journal, Z, which perfectly illustrates the process of autonomous organization of the population in the face of the decomposition and collapse of the State apparatus. The example is valid for any other European country; the difference is only one of degree. Let us recapitulate some of the difficulties that stand in the way of autonomy: the inertia of a life subject to the commodity, the habit of appealing to the State for help, egoism, the rise of fascism, police repression, weariness in the face of constant sacrifices, etc. A life of freedom is not an easy road, but a life of slavery is not easy, either.

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Athens: Nikos Romanos ended his hunger strike

Nikos Romanos, anarchist prisoner in Greece, was on hunger strike from the 10th of November until the 10th of December 2014. The judicial mechanisms refused his furlough request to attend university classes. In response to this, multiform actions of solidarity took place inside and outside the prisons of Greek democracy and internationally. Seeing that his initial request was repeatedly and vengefully denied, our comrade was blackmailed to accept electronic tagging as an option for getting educational furloughs eventually, “a last resort” that became more pressing as his health was quickly deteriorating. In fact, he chose to stop his hunger strike only after the Greek parliament voted almost unanimously (with the exception of two MPs of the main ruling party according to the official record, while MPs of the Nazi party were apparently quasi-present at the vote) in favor of an amendment proposed by the justice minister

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Student protests and clashes in Greece

It’s been sometime since we last heard from the Greek movement. But, thanks to the Greek government and its riot police, today became a day of large student demonstrations, clashes with the cops, injuries and rising tension. First, let’s see what happened. Early in the morning, the Athens Law School students arrived at their University in order to apply their Assembly decision, which included a symbolic occupation of their University until the 17th of November, commemoration day of the 1973 student revolt against the military dictatorship. The problem was that the school was already occupied by the riot police. The Athenian Universities’ rectors had decided to apply a peculiar “lock out” of the students and employees, supposedly for “security reasons”...

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Laissez faire, security, and liberalism: revisiting December 2008

In December 2008, Athens became world news for the first time in recent years, for a reason that was soon overshadowed by the financial and debt crisis that came immediately after. I think it would be useful to revisit this event now, when it is not so loaded any more in terms of public attention and affect. This reason was a totally unpredicted, contingent event: the pointless murder of a youngster by a policeman, which sparked a wave of massive and angry protests for several days in Athens –including in neighbourhoods where no demonstrations had ever taken place in living memory- as well as in all major Greek cities, and several minor ones.

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Saturday Mothers meet for 500th time to protest disappearances

Since 1995, Saturday Mothers demand justice for their “lost” every week at Galatasaray Square, Istanbul. Each Saturday, the relatives of the disappeared, their friends and comrades and human rights activists have been assembling at Galatasaray at 12:00 holding carnations and pictures of the disappeared. Last Saturday protesters came together for the 500th week of sit-in with the request "find the lost, judge the perpetrators”. During the protest thousands of people gave them support, and shouted that their struggles won’t end until justice is done.

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Kurdistan – a people’s quest for freedom and democratic autonomy

This document will summarize what is happening in Syria and Rojava (Western Kurdistan). There are many ethnic and religious communities living in Syria. One of these is the Kurds. We will give a summary of what the Kurds have gone through in the past three years, from bloody conflict to their approach to war, attacks on their region and their proposals for a solution. What we present here may appear to be a Kurdish proposal for peace; however, we believe that if applied more broadly, it could be a model for a peaceful and democratic Syria as a whole.

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On the Scottish referendum

On the 18th of September, Scotland has voted to stay in the United Kingdom after voters rejected independence: in overall the 55% of the electorate rejected the proposal compared to 45% who supported this initiative. This result - which relieved London, the markets and the leaders of the European parliament (who seemed ready to move heaven and earth to defend the Union [1]) - was somehow expected. From the first day the Edinburgh Agreement of 2012 was signed (as a consequence of the success of Scottish National Party - SNP - in the elections of May 2011) which paved the way for the referendum, opinion polls showed that only 30-35 % wanted independence.

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Naples activists prepare to protest ECB

Activists were gearing up Wednesday for a march to protest a meeting of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Naples. Activists called on the unemployed, the under-employed, students, and like-minded people to join the rally against the European leaders’ handling of the economic crisis “with the complicity of governments”. They said that they were particularly concerned about the troika, involving the European Union, the ECB, and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which has imposed harsh conditions on some countries in economic trouble. The troika’s involvement in Greece, for example, has been controversial.

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Bourgeois Influence on Anarchism

The minds of men, especially of the young, thirsting for the mysterious and extraordinary, allow themselves to be easily dragged by the passion for the new toward that which, when coolly examined in the calm which follows initial enthusiasm, is absolutely and definitively repudiated. This fever for new things, this audacious spirit, this zeal for the extraordinary has brought to the anarchist ranks the most exaggeratedly impressionable types, and at the same time, the most empty headed and frivolous types, persons who are not repelled by the absurd, but who, on the contrary, engage in it. They are attracted to projects and ideas precisely because they are absurd, and so anarchism comes to be known precisely for the illogical character and ridiculousness which ignorance and bourgeois calumny have attributed to anarchist doctrines.

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